Getting Kids Outdoors: The nature of boys

From the moment they come into this world, boys have an appetite and energy that does not stop. One minute they are laughing and playing together, the next they're wrestling and fists and toys are flailing across the room. As a mom of two boys, I admit at first I did everything to keep the peace and prevent any and all outbursts, outbreaks and outlaw-ish behavior. I didn't want to raise rough, rowdy boys, instead I wanted sensitive, respectful and loving young men. Not that I have given up on the sensitive, respectful and loving part — which they most definitely can be — but it took a while to accept that boys need opportunities that allow them to be boys. It's in their DNA to run, wrestle and conquer and they will do anything to be king of the mountain even if it is just a pile of dirt. Boys need space to do the things boys love to do, and an outlet to release the unbelievable amount of energy they have. Fortunately, the outdoors has the space and nature has the patience and durability to let boys be boys. 

Read more at petoskeynews.com

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Fact or fiction? Seven persistent myths about child care

Nov 2014 | Canada

BRIEFing Note from the Childcare Resource and Research Unit identifies seven common myths about child care and provides responses for each based on what we know from research, policy and practice.
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The evolution of Canada's child care debates

Canadians have long grappled with the meanings and purposes of child care.

As Canadians gather for ChildCare2020 -- the country's fourth national child care policy conference -- in Winnipeg on November 13, it’s worthwhile to reflect on how child care debates have unfolded over the past several decades, and particularly how the three previous national conferences -- in 1971, 1982, and 2004 -- acted as important landmarks in the sometimes-rocky landscape of Canadian child care history.

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Stephen Harper announces $3B of tax breaks for families with children

OTTAWA—With an election on the horizon, Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s government is moving to put more money in the pockets of Canadians through a $3-billion boost in family tax breaks.

The overhaul of family taxation, announced by Harper in a mini-budget at a campaign-style event in Vaughan, includes a limited form of income-splitting, increased monthly baby bonus payments and an expansion of the tax deduction parents can claim for child care expenses.

Read full article at Toronto Star

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Income splitting won’t help parents who really need a tax break

The Harper government’s parental income splitting plan is designed in such a way that guarantees it will only make a difference to the richest Canadians. By design, it cannot help those who need assistance with child care the most.

 

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Moving Child Care Forward



This brief summarizes what is known about the childcare workforce in Canada, the implications of this for regulated childcare, and identifies some considerations and strategies to address the ongoing issues and improve the overall state of ECEC. A summary of the relevant research and data leads to the conclusion that a coordinated and comprehensive strategy is needed to address the multiple and interconnected variables that impact the working conditions of those in the childcare workforce.

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Six lessons Canada can learn from other countries when it comes to child care

Globe and Mail feature writer Erin Anderssen shows us how Canada compares to other countries when it comes to child care, and offers six examples of things we can learn from those countries to improve our own system.

Watch now on The Globe and Mail 

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Getting less bang for the child care buck – all $6.8 billion of them

BriefingNote from CRRU analyzes Federal spending on child care via the UCCB, the Child Care Expense Deduction, and hypothetical income-splitting.

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Video: Globe Now: The daycare debate: A look at the politics of affordable child care

Affan Chowdhry is joined by Martha Friendly to discuss Canada's daycare policy. Then, The Globe's Erin Anderssen offers six lessons Canada can learn from other countries when it comes to effective child care.

View video here

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AECEO responds to NDP National Childcare program announcement

Early Childhood Educators are the backbone of a national childcare program.

October 16. 2014

The Association of Early Childhood Educators Ontario (AECEO) welcomes the announcement made yesterday by Thomas Mulcair and the Federal NDP regarding their plan to implement a national high quality and affordable childcare program if elected.

We join our colleagues in the childcare community in applauding the NDP for establishing the foundation for a national conversation around early childhood education and childcare (ECEC) leading up to the 2015 election and for their commitment to making childcare affordable for families.

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City of Ottawa has no plan to spend $3.6M childcare reserve

Ottawa Citizen, 05.04.2014

The city has no plan to spend the $3.6 million it has collected through development charges to build new childcare spaces, even though many Ottawa families wait for months to secure a spot in a licensed centre.

The money has been accumulating since 2009 and can only be spent on childcare centres owned or operated by the city. But because such a venture is not on the horizon, the city has decided to sit on the cash and is also proposing in its updated development charges bylaw to pause any further collection.
That’s a big mistake, says the former head of the department that oversees childcare.

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Classroom Design and How it Influences Behavior

Early childhood classrooms serve as the physical environment for adults and young children for most of their waking hours. Although it is important for classrooms to be attractive to the eye, it is equally, if not more important, that they function effectively.

Your childcare environment influences how you feel about yourself and your job, and how you as an early childhood professional relate to the children in your care. The children in your care experience the environment indirectly though interactions with you, and directly through their own experience with the physical setting.

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Crowded, chaotic classrooms hurt Ontario full-day kindergarten push

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Infant care spaces are disappearing across Muskoka

By Jennifer Bowman, Bracebridge Examiner

MUSKOKA — It was expected and now it’s here.

Daycares are changing how they operate and who they serve now that full-day kindergarten has taken their most profitable clientele, those aged 3.8 years and older. The last round of schools to implement full-day kindergarten will open their new classrooms this fall, landing the final blow to some daycares.

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The case against for-profit ‘big box’ child care

Child care should be a public good to benefit all, not a business whose goals may have little to do with serving children, families and community.

Laurel Rothman/Martha Friendly, Toronto Star - Aug. 7, 2014

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A national childcare program can address key themes in the 2014 pre-budget consultation

Brief submitted to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance pre-budget consultation by the Childcare Resource and Research Unit argues that "a real national childcare program would be both the smart thing and the right thing to do for Canada".

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Why fixing First Nations education remains so far out of reach

Aboriginal youth face a fate that should horrify Canadians and there’s an obvious fix

Ending the cycle of poverty and violence among Aboriginal youth can seem like an impossibly daunting endeavour. After decades of negotiations, commissions and protests, including last year’s Idle No More movement and Ottawa’s recent unsuccessful attempt to reform First Nations education funding, Aboriginal children continue to face a fate that should horrify most Canadians.

Macleans Magazine, Tamsin McMahon - July 14, 2014

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Grandparents raising their grandchildren

A growing number of Canadian grandparents are caregivers of their grandchildren. And most of these caregivers are single females with limited incomes.  Toronto Star, Aug. 3, 2014

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Risky play and skinned knees are key to healthy child development

In the last generation, adults have been consumed with protecting kids against all odds.  

But now, some child injury prevention experts are warning too much bubble wrap may be thwarting healthy development.  Toronto Star - July 29, 2014

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Summer eceLINK Now ONLINE!

In this issue:

  • AECEO Position Paper on Professional Learning for RECEs
  • Teaching on the Other Side of the World
  • AECEO Certification
  • Outdoor Natural Spaces for Learning Inspiration for RECEs
  • Endeavours to Enhance the Lives of Children with Autism through Nature Based Learning
  • Early Childhood Leadership Program
  • Addressing ECE Student Needs

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